Cloudbreak POC – Building a Cluster LAB

Provisioning via Browser

 
You can log into the Cloudbreak application at http://<Public_IP>:3000/.
Let’s repeat this again. The main goal of the Cloudbreak UI is to easily create clusters on your own cloud provider account, or in this case, RedHat’s version of the private cloud, the OSP8. A previous post explained underlying infrastructure, and how I prepared the LAB environment.
For reference here is topology view:
screenshot
 Using the browser the Cloudbreak cluster can be created in four steps:
  1. connect your OpenStack account with Cloudbreak
  2. create some template resources on the UI that describe the infrastructure of your clusters
  3. create a blueprint that describes the HDP services in your clusters
  4. launch the cluster itself based on these resources
For detailed instructions please visit Cloudbreak documentation site:

1. Creating user account

This is where I linked my Private cloud account with Cloudbreak. I am using OpenStack options to create an account, specifying project scope and openstack domain where project lives. The endpoint also needs to reflect V3 authentication protocol.
462de4d1-3f19-4e86-89c8-39cf24ecebc1

2. Create templates and resources

I created network pointing to existing local VLAN. The floating  [external], internal  network, and internal network subnet Id I took from openstack network details for my project.
screenshot

 

To create a template is very simple process of specifying number of volumes to attach to the VM and its size:
screenshot

 

3. Create a blueprint

 
The last step is to create a blueprint. I used a template referenced in online guide to quickly test my configuration:
{
  "host_groups": [
    {
      "name": "master",
      "components": [
        {
          "name": "NAMENODE"
        },
        {
          "name": "SECONDARY_NAMENODE"
        },
        {
          "name": "RESOURCEMANAGER"
        },
        {
          "name": "APP_TIMELINE_SERVER"
        },
        {
          "name": "HISTORYSERVER"
        },
        {
          "name": "ZOOKEEPER_SERVER"
        }
      ],
      "cardinality": "1"
    },
    {
      "name": "slave_1",
      "components": [
        {
          "name": "DATANODE"
        },
        {
          "name": "HDFS_CLIENT"
        },
        {
          "name": "NODEMANAGER"
        },
        {
          "name": "YARN_CLIENT"
        },
        {
          "name": "MAPREDUCE2_CLIENT"
        },
        {
          "name": "ZOOKEEPER_CLIENT"
        }
      ],
      "cardinality": "2"
    }
  ],
  "Blueprints": {
    "blueprint_name": "multi-node-hdfs-yarn",
    "stack_name": "HDP",
    "stack_version": "2.3"
  }
}

 

Below is the same view, but as a list or resources.
screenshot

 

4. Launch the cluster

Now all I have left to do is to create my first Hadoop Data Platform cluster.
In a simple to follow wizard I need to select my account, network, blueprint and VM’s flavour.
screenshot

 

This  is the cluster details after cluster creation.
 screenshot

Verification

This is the view of all started services:
fb887634-6a96-43fd-a535-12dd99179f01

 

Here is the list and status of running nodes:
37443b4b-bde7-423b-847c-472c47ed4617

 

And finally if expanded history option provides more information of current cluster’s state.
adcd2c11-9f36-4390-990c-51a9b82053ca

 

Now that HDP Cluster is up and running we can verify the same from private cloud console.
35d318b9-e0ac-400f-91a7-092667dad647

 

The next POST will show how to use Ambari interface.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *